Contents

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you’ve ever looked into Glock conversions or stabilizers, you’ve probably seen the same options I have…and been a little unimpressed. I’ve tried a large number of these types of things, and the best option I’ve come across has always been the MechTech Glock Carbine Conversion , which is alright, but I don’t love it enough to recommend it to anyone.  In fact, my recommendation has usually been to just build yourself an AR in a pistol caliber chambering with something like a 9mm Glock-compatible lower ($139.

Micro Roni Stab Review: Best Glock Conversion on the Market?

Micro Roni Stab Review: Best Glock Conversion on the Market?Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you’ve ever looked into Glock conversions or stabilizers, you’ve probably seen the same options I have…and been a little unimpressed. I’ve tried a large number of these types of things, and the best option I’ve come across has always been the MechTech Glock Carbine Conversion , which is alright, but I don’t love it enough to recommend it to anyone.  In fact, my recommendation has usually been to just build yourself an AR in a pistol caliber chambering with something like a 9mm Glock-compatible lower ($139.00). That was until I opened a little box from Israel containing a CAA Micro Roni Stabilizer Brace . Sling and sights not included. Disclosure: YRS Inc sent me this for free, but please don’t think that has in anyway colored my opinion of the product.  Make no mistake, I realllllly like this thing, but that has nothing to do with the price, or lack thereof.  In fact, in just a minute, you’ll see how little my getting one for free mattered in the end. So, what makes this thing so great?  Well, that’s kind of a long story. Let’s start with… Function The Micro Roni Stab is something of a hybrid between a Sig-style Pistol Brace and a true carbine conversion like the one from MechTech. Instead of taking the slide off like you do with the MechTech, you just attach the charging handle to the rear slide serrations, slide the pistol (in my case a Glock 19, but there are a host of options available) into the brace, and lock the latch at the rear. It’s all very simple, and while I wouldn’t want to have to do it quickly, its definitely easier than some of the other carbine conversions out there.  Best of all, you don’t have to disassemble the pistol at all, and you maintain all the same access to the controls that you’d normally have. To remove the pistol, you press down on two tabs on the front of the stabilizer, and press a button to release the rear locking latch, and then you just slide the pistol out. The latches on the front are pretty similar to the disassembly latches on Glocks…slide down and then youre good to go. From there, just wiggle the charging handle off the rear of the gun, and you’re back to your standard carry piece. Everything locks together firmly with nice audible and tactile clicks that leave no doubt about whether or not the pistol is properly seated.  After a few repetitions, I was able to perform the process quickly and easily, even in the dark. Once the pistol is latched in, there is virtually no wiggle or “give” and everything feels very solid. "The Micro Roni" is also equipped with a folding stock that allows you to transport it a little easier, but it doesn’t really work well if you want to shoot it with the stock folded.  I don’t really see a way for the design to be changed to allow you to shoot it normally with the stock folded, but it did annoy me a little, even if it ultimately doesn’t make much difference. There is also a “safety” of sorts in the form of a little flap that you can push over to cover the trigger on both sides.  I’d like to see a version with either a locking flap, or maybe one that’s a little stiffer, but I probably will never, ever use it anyway so it’s not a big deal for me. I figure about 90% of you have never wanted a Glock safety, but here’s one if you’re into that sorta thing. Construction The Micro Roni is made with an aluminum spine that houses the locking mechanism, surrounded by a high-density polymer that feels almost identical to the polymer used in Glock frames. The polymer frame has shown no signs of wear after a few hundred rounds, and several days of being thrown around in my range duffel.  Its also survived getting knocked off a loading table, and tossed into the dirt at my local range.  While I wouldn’t recommend doing that with yours, mine survived just fine. In fact, the only thing that I really didn’t care for in the construction was the lack of a metal hinge for the folding stock, and the use of polymer for some of the locking surfaces, but again this is kind of a minor niggle.  Nothing about the construction makes me think any of these parts are likely to fail, but I know me. I know how rough I am on gear.  One of my range buddies likes to joke that I was cursed by a gypsy, my fiance thinks I’m part Neanderthal.  I’m not sure either of them are wrong. Actual picture of me around anything breakable. Point is, if it can break, I assume it will break, and plastic makes me nervous, even if it shouldn’t.  It was a long time before I got on the Glock hype train (though I am now all aboard on that score) and I expect it will be a bit before I’m fully on-board with a polymer carbine conversion. In fairness, I don’t care for polymer AR-15 lowers or kydex holsters either, so feel free to ignore me on this one. If you want to add more functionality (or in my case, more things to break) there is a full-length 1913 rail on top, with removable sections of rail on either side of the fore-end where you can slap lights, lasers, coffee grinders, and even CAA’s super-cool thumbrests made specifically for the Roni that I really like the look of, but haven’t tested out *hint hint hint YRS Inc*. Honestly, I’m not 100% sure how much of a difference it would make, but it looks cool, and I want it. Which is a perfectly reasonable position when it comes to gun stuff. Ergonomics So, the whole point of this thing is to help you shoot better.  To do that, step one is to improve on the ergonomics of your handgun…making it easier to hold, aim, control under fire, etc. Admittedly, aiming to improve the ergonomics of a brick isn’t exactly a lofty goal. So, how does it do? Well, first off, the simple fact that you get a stock or a brace (depending on whether you shoulder it, or use it as an actual brace) and room to grip the fore-end like a dedicated carbine makes it much easier to shoot and do so accurately. Overall, the "Micro Roni Stab" is a good half-way point between a true PDW or pistol caliber carbine like the CZ Scorpion EVO ($989.00) and just using the handgun on its own. With the stock unfolded, the Micro Roni is right at 18″ long, making it a little on short side for a PDW, but its still a good size where I could see anyone from police officers to folks on executive protection detail being able to move easily in and out of vehicles and other tight spaces. Personally, I had a grand time chasing imaginary intruders around my house (with the gun very unloaded with a chamber flag in) and could definitely see it being used for indoor work, as well as for occasions where you need a little more range outdoors. The Roni brace is comfortable to use, whether you have it shouldered or if used as an actual brace.  I expected to feel like my hands were a little cramped on the small-ish carbine conversion, but it really isn’t bad. Legality forbids a vertical foregrip without NFA paperwork, but even so I had no problem gripping the front of the brace during long periods of rapid-fire. There is a version of the Micro Roni that comes with a magazine holder up front that doubles as a grip, but the Micro Roni Stab that I tested was just fine. My biggest issue with the Micro Roni was actually an ergonomic one…and it was also easily fixed.  The edges of the frame that lie just above where your shooting hand rests are kinda sharp out of the box.  I ended up with a little bit of irritation on my hand near the web between my thumb and trigger finger, right about where you would expect slidebite on say, a 1911 if you grip too high on the beavertail. I’m a fairly handy fellow, and I mod almost all my guns.  I possess great swathes of sandpaper, and many, many files.  About two seconds with a file, and 15 seconds with some sand paper fixed the problem, and I would be highly surprised if anyone noticed I’d done anything to the area at all, unless they had another Micro Roni to compare it to. I happen to have a spare lying around for reasons I’ll discuss later, and mine feels much smoother and no longer rubs the skin off the back of my hand.  Problem solved. My hand no longer hurts, things are good. Accuracy Here’s the big one…how much does it actually improve accuracy?  I’d heard good things, and it immediately felt like it would improve accuracy, but obviously I have to test things for myself. To put the Micro Roni through its paces, I slapped a spare Bushnell TRS Red Dot on it (my preferred cheapo red dot) and went to the range. Accuracy Testing Methodology Everybody has their own way of doing accuracy testing.  Your way might be better than mine.  I try to do things as fairly as possible. I started with a box of ammo I know my Glock likes: Remington Golden Saber 147gr BJHP ($25.00). From there, I wanted to test accuracy under a variety of different conditions.  I wanted to try the Micro Roni shouldered vs used as a brace vs freehand shooting vs shooting off a bag.  Then, for shiggles and gits, I decided to break the freehand category into shooting one handed and shooting two handed.  Here’s what I found. Glock 19 w/Roni Brace Shouldered (25yds) Glock 19 w/Roni Brace Glock 19 Off Sandbag (25yds) Glock 19 One Hand (25yds) Glock 19 Two Hand (25yds) 2.25″ 3.06″ 2.35″ 3.55″ 3.11″ 2.38″ 3.29″ 2.56″ 4.12″ 3.48″ 2.13″ 3.48″ 2.02″ 3.68″ (discarding one called flyer) 3.67″ Avg Group: 2.25″ Avg Group: 3.27″ Avg Group: 2.31″ Avg Group: 3.78″ Avg Group: 3.42″ So, looking at my sciency-ish data, here’s what I learned…it works! My groups with the brace shouldered were basically on par with the groups I had shooting off a bag, which surprised me.  I was a little disappointed that my groups with the Roni used as an actual brace weren’t better, but that may just be my general awkwardness using it that way. I don’t have a huge amount of experience shooting with a Sig-style brace, and I feel like that may have affected my accuracy a little.  That being said, the brace still performed a bit better than I shot two-handed which is what you would hope would be the case. I also handed it off to a buddy with much more experience using braces like this, and his group was much tighter than mine…almost a full inch. All in all, I was very pleased with the extra accuracy I got out of the Micro Roni Brace…so much so that I actually got in touch with YRS Inc and purchased one for myself.  Well actually, I purchased the Micro Roni that YRS Inc sent me for review, at a discount.  That review Micro Roni is currently sitting in my “Things Have Gone Wrong” SHTF bag under my bed, waiting for the apocalypse, or for my next range trip. I really do like this thing, guys. If you have a Glock, I strongly recommend picking one up. Final Thoughts So, the Micro Roni improves ergonimics, boosts accuracy, and looks damn cool.  Its not perfect, but its certainly worth picking up if you are looking for a rugged, affordable Glock carbine conversion.  I trust it enough that I’d use it to defend my home and loved ones.  I can’t give a higher endorsement than that. So, what do you think of the Micro Roni?  Do you want one?  Excited for the giveaway?  Let us know in the comments below!

FN Adds M249S Para to Military Collector Series

FN Adds M249S Para to Military Collector Series

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2989292_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2989292_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Last year around this time, FN brought out its new Military Collector Series of firearms. In that first launch, the manufacturer introduced three firearms: the FN 15 Military Collector M4, FN 15 Military Collector M16, and the FN M249S, a semi-automatic version of the company's classic military M249 SAW. This year, FN has announced it is expanding its "Military Collector Series" to include a fourth firearm, this one another M249S variant. The new M249S Para is a semi-auto replica of the M249 originally developed for and issued to airborne troops. The two most notable changes between the original M249S introduced this past year and the new M249S Para are the iconic telescoping and rotating buttstock and the shorter 16.1-inch cold hammer-forged, machine gun-grade barrel. These changes result in a shorter overall length of 30.5 to 36 inches compared to the original's 40.75-inch fixed overall length, and they shave off roughly a pound from the overall weight. Related GunDigest Articles First Look: FN Military Collector Series M4 Built for Duty: FN Military Collector Series M4 and M16 FNH AR-15: 3 New Models in Military Collector Series “The M249S Para is the fourth in our series of classic, semi-automatic FN military rifles and like the Standard, the Para is authentic to the last possible detail,” said John Keppeler, senior vice president of sales and marketing for FN America, LLC. “You’ll notice only two major differences between the semi- and full-auto versions – the barrel length and reconfigured internal components to change the rifle’s operation from open-bolt to closed-bolt. Authenticity was critical in this series and we changed as little as possible.” In pursuit of this authenticity, the new FN M249S Para incorporates the classic M249 flip-up feed tray, an integrated steel bipod, and FN's robust gas-piston system. The new gun does retain most of the features found on the previous M249S, and it can be converted back to the original model configuration in around 30 seconds.

Ruger Precision Rifle: Quick Notes

Ruger Precision Rifle: Quick Notes

For individuals who are concerned with weapon consolidation and upkeep costs, Ruger has introduced the Precision Rifle. I am not a bolt gun guy, but I have to give props to the RPR due to its parts compatibility with AR15 rifles and AR15 gunsmithing tools. The rifle uses AR15 style barrel nuts, can accept AR15 rails, and utilizes a plate designed to accept AR15 butt-stocks, though Ruger includes their own assembly. One last touch is the AR15 grip. Parts commonality is a big deal to me. I want to use the same tools I purchased for one gun on every gun. This would fit that philosophy well. See it here. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Private Property: Control and Patrol

Private Property: Control and Patrol

Private lands left uncontrolled and not patrolled will soon fall victim to trespassers, poachers, thieves, and no goods.  Every year landowners, hunters, and others roll into their recreational camps, retreats or Bug Out locations only to find evidence of vandalism, theft, and outright meanness. James Wesley Rawles recommends to live in your survival retreat.  For a lot of people that is not an option or at least an option they are willing to consider.  Are there ways to protect your private holdings from prying eyes, fence jumpers, and road riders?  In practice, even a little preventative action can go a long way toward securing your family’s survival retreat. When I pulled up over the hill on my ATV to look across the long harvested soybean field I knew something was wrong immediately.  A quick glance through my binoculars gave confirmation.  Someone was sitting on hunting stand at the far end of the field who did not belong there. I sat for a minute or two observing the guy hustling down the ladder, turning back to look, then scampering off into the woods behind the stand.  He had either slipped in from a hunting club west of our lease, or else he got dropped off on the highway.  He was long gone, but hopefully just the off chance of catching the trespasser on the property may deter him from coming back.  Either way, I reported it to the landowner. Private Property Security Basics Mississippi has a law on the books that automatically posts all private land as off limits to trespassers or others without permission to be on someone’s property.  We also have laws on the books against robbing banks and speeding down the highway.  Such laws are only enforced if the offender is caught in the act or a report turns up the guilty party later on.  Therefore, it is incumbent on landowners to control and patrol their own land as a deterrent to lawless behaviors . A security assessment is a good way to determine the strengths and weaknesses of your property security efforts.  You may discover gaps in the “firewall” that may allow uninvited guests access to your property.  If there is a law enforcement officer in the county sheriff’s department that you can trust, pay him a few bucks to check out your property for security recommendations. Fix the obvious things first like entry points.  Are there good, solid gates blocking every entrance to your place from surrounding highways or county roads?  Are these gates well maintained, chain locked, and posted?  Do you check them regularly?  Be sure to add highly visible “posted” signs along stretches beside roadways and borders to other properties not under your control. If you don’t know your neighbors on all sides, get out there and meet them.  They may make excellent friends, or they may the source of intrusions.  Know which it is.  Post other areas of easy access.  It might be a power line or gas pipe right-of-way which is still your land not owned by the power company as some trespassers we caught declared.  People often do not understand this or they just choose to ignore it. Another is access is via a railroad track .  We have had Louisiana hunters ride down the side of the tracks to our open power line right-of-way and sit there in their truck with rifles out the window.  Other points include weak areas in barbed wire fences.  Since our hunting land is a short walk from town, city folks have created crossing spots by cutting the wire fence or riding it down so they can cross over, even on ATVs.  We have even caught them in the process of throwing rabbit dogs over the fence. Once gates are locked and all the visible points to the property are blanketed with visible “No Trespassing” signs, then you can concentrate on out buildings, camp houses, or other infrastructure. Dwelling Security The old saying about it being impossible to keep out the highly motivated thief is unfortunately true.  If they want to get into your camp house, trailer, or equipment shed, they will.  Our camp house has been broken into twice in the last 15 years, each time over the Fourth of July weekend.  We figured it was somebody from out of town on a visit.  Each time they took a cheap microwave oven and an electric can opener.  That is about all we leave behind. The camp house next to ours was less fortunate.  They left all their hunting clothes, boots, and gear.  It was all taken.  They left boxes of ammunition, flashlights , and knives.  All gone.  For some reason in this case they loaded up all the kitchen flat wear, pots, pans, and small appliances.  Basically they were cleaned out.  Take home stuff of value or get a good safe that you can mount securely to your wall. Now it has been well over ten years since we have had any problems.  Why?  For one thing we killed the bright florescent night light outside on the power pole.  It was a beacon from the highway that residences were there back in the woods.  We figured that light was actually helping them see their way out with our stuff. We also let the entry road into camp grow up on the sides so the houses could not be seen from the highway.  Now it just looks like a gate going into farming land.  The main entry gate is always locked even when we are there.   It is amazing, but if we leave that gate open somebody is going to drive in there while we are there just to see where the road goes.  This happens nearly every hunting season.  Once they see people, they either scat or have some lame excuse about looking for somebody’s house.  Three doctors wanted to duck hunt once, and another guy wanted access to the river to fish.  Repel all such inquiries and requests.  Tell them there is a resident living there all year long and they may not come back. Certainly all dwellings should be securely locked.  One member owner of our group postulated that it was better to just leave camp houses unlocked, but I have never been comfortable with that idea.  I recommend leaving no lights on either unless you are on the property.  Lock any parked vehicles and chain up ATV s before departing for even a short time. It is terrible to have to live this way in America, but most folks who have been victimized have come to realize the realities of the society we deal with now.  Some folks just do not respect private property or what you have worked so hard to obtain.  Here is one other piece of advice for you to consider.  I leave a loaded pistol on my camp house bedroom nightstand over night and with me during the day, just in case I am there when the unwanted come back. Please share your ideas below for keeping your retreat safe. Photos by: NewRambler Franco Folini PJChimel Madison Corbin Other interesting articles: When Your Bug Out Location Becomes Ground Zero 4 Types of Base Camps and When to Use Them Survival Gear Review: Smith & Wesson .380 Bodyguard Backup Back to Basics

Gun Review: Rock River Arms LAR-8 Elite Operator

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f3768caa61ff_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f3768caa61ff_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Rock River Arms serves up an AR in .308, and it doesn't disappoint. The first thing you notice about the "Rock River Arms" LAR-8 Elite Operator is that you have a stout yet maneuverable rifle in your hands. True it is heavier than a .223 version, but it is well-balanced and easy to handle. When people start splitting hairs as to what really constitutes a “battle rifle” often times the discussion comes back around to caliber. Was the AR-15 really designed as a battle rifle? Or, by virtue of its smaller cartridge, was the AR-15 some other sort of weapon? Is the AR-15 designed for uses similar to the M-1 Carbine or the German STG-43 than to the M-14 or M-1 Garand? This is the debate.  Sure the AR-15 functions, but with its little bullet, it can’t really be called a battle rifle, can it? Well, there are lots of rifle makers these days taking caliber out of the debate by building AR-style rifles in .308. This, of course, starts another debate. The .308 AR-rifle is what Eugene Stoner envisioned from the start. So, are we moving ahead with a .308 AR or are we going back to the starting point? Perhaps these are questions too big for this article, but luckily we don’t have to answer them. Rock River Arms stepped up and gave the world a .308 caliber AR rifle that hits with the power of a battle rifle, but carries like an AR-15.  The LAR-8 Elite Operator won’t stop the debate, but will certainly provide the power, accuracy and versatility modern shooters really want. Rock River Arms LAR 308 Elite Operator. Out of the Box The first thing you notice upon assembly is that you have a stout yet maneuverable rifle in your hands. True it is heavier than a .223 version, but it is well balanced and easy to handle. Adjust the buttstock to your liking and the rifle comes up naturally and easily. An especially nice touch is the “half-quad” handguard. Sure, when you say “half-quad” you might think of just two rails, but don’t worry, it has all four. But the rails simply run half the length of the handguard; from the gas block back. From the magazine well forward the handguard is just that, a handguard… with a knurled aluminum free-float tube that is both comfortable and easy to grip. You don’t often mount accessories that close to the magazine well anyway. That’s where you want to hold when you fire so this half-quad only makes sense. Related GunDigest Articles Rock River Arms LAR-300 X-1 Review First Look: Colt Delta Elite Rail Gun Gun Digest's Five Best Posts on Gun Buying and Gun Selling The flip-up front sight is a well-built unit with stout ears protecting the adjustable front post. Designed and built by RRA, this sight is an example of the great ideas and sound execution in the manufacturing processes. The gas block front sight also serves as the anchor for three different sling attachment points. There is one on each side of the barrel and one below allowing you to mount any sort of sling system you would like. Beneath the sight is a one-inch section of picatinny rail in case you need it. We mounted a Command Arms bipod on the lower portion of the quad rail and that worked slick. That bipod can stow with the legs pointing forward or aft for even more versatility. I would have liked to see a rear sight on this rifle, but that’s an option, not factory standard. I guess the folks at RRA want to let you choose your own rear sight, but I would prefer to see this rifle ready to rock right out of the box. And speaking of which… the Rock River hard case is solid, well built and easily identifiable as the container of an RRA product. It is also specifically not what I would like in a hard case. You must disassemble the rifle to place it in the case and you can’t put an upper with optics into the blue box.  The good news is that’s the only part of this rifle I could complain about. Meaning this is an outstanding rifle. The first thing you notice about the Rock River Arms LAR-8 Elite Operator is that you have a stout yet maneuverable rifle in your hands. True it is heavier than a .223 version, but it is well balanced and easy to handle. Just How Good? I think it was Ben Franklin who said “The proof of the pudding is determined by how many 165-grain bullets you’re able to put into a bad guy in five seconds.” In this case, let’s say five would be the minimum. If you have ever handled an AR-style rifle, the controls on the LAR 8 will be almost second nature. I say almost, because there are two small changes on this rifle. The magazine release button is now ambidextrous and can be activated from either side of the rifle and the bolt release is located at the bottom rear of the magazine well. It is an ambidextrous lever you push straight down, with your trigger finger if you like. Gone are the days of slamming a magazine home and slapping the left side of the receiver with your left hand to run the bolt forward. While we are on the topic of magazines, the Elite Operator used FAL metric and L1A1 inch magazines. So there should be no trouble finding 20-round boxes for your reloads. The Rock River Arms-designed gasblock incorporates a pop-up front sight, sling attachment points on three sides and a short Picatinny rail making the rifle ready for anything. Now, on to the shooting. For the day’s festivities I quickly mounted a Trijicon Reflex on top of the Elite Operator. Quickly, as in, I set the sight on the top rail, flipped the ARMS locks and started shooting. It was dead on. I started plinking at 25 yards. Then still shooting offhand, I engaged the targets at 50 and 75 yards. Finally, I braced the rifle on the post and started dropping rounds on the 100-yard target. Combat accuracy was outstanding, scoring minute-of-bad guy hits on everything I pointed at. This prompted me to drop a few sandbags on the bench and drop some rounds downrange in an effort to see where they would fall if I was really trying to shoot a nice group. With the zero-power magnification Reflex sight aligned on the dead of the Dirty Bird target I rolled through the trigger press, firing as quickly as I could get the dot back on the group. On a grid target, accuracy lives up to the Rock River Arms’ claim of 1.5 MOA at 100 yards. The two-stage trigger allows for perfect control and a clean break. The Smith flash hider worked very well and the 1:10 twist ratio seemed perfect for the 165-grain Hornady TAP ammo. Another feature I really liked was the sealed battery storage area behind the rubber buttplate. Push the button on the left side of the buttplate and it slides down exposing a storage area for several of the CR123 batteries. Each battery tube is also spring-loaded to make sure your batteries come out as easy as they go in. If there is one thing to note about the .308 caliber AR-style rifles on the market, it is that parts are not universally interchangeable. Where as most AR-15 rifle parts from most makers will drop in and function, the same is not true of the bigger guns. Each maker has apparently come up with what they consider to be the best idea for some part or another. As stated on the RRA website, the LAR-8 uses a unique receiver thread and barrel nut. No barrel nut (either separate or as part of a tubular handguard or quad rail handguard) except those made specifically for the RRA LAR-8 should ever be used on an RRA LAR-8 or upper half. Although some other barrel nuts may thread onto the LAR-8 upper receiver, the depth of thread is incorrect. Use of incorrect parts may cause injury or death. So, now you know that. The parts don’t interchange with other .308 AR parts out there. Don’t try it. The Rock River Arms LAR-8 Elite Operator gives you a rifle and a platform that offers power and versatility. In a law enforcement capacity you will get greater range if you need it and more penetration around buildings and vehicles. If you want to use this as a Modern Sporting Rifle, the Elite Operator will have no trouble taking deer-sized game at any range you feel comfortable shooting. With the Elite Operator you can hit hard and fast with no debate. This article appeared in the January 3, 2011 issue of Gun Digest the Magazine . NEXT STEP: Download Your Free Storm Tactical Printable Target Pack 62 Printable MOA Targets with DOT Drills - Rifle Range in YARDS This impressive target pack from our friends at Storm Tactical contains 62 printable targets for rifle and handgun range use. Target grids and bullseye sizes are in MOA. Ideal for long-range shooting! Get Free Targets

Upgrade Your Accuracy Best Marlin 795 Scopes of 2020

Finding the best Marlin 795 scope might be a challenge, especially if you’re trying to look for one that sticks out from all the others flooding the market. But knowing exactly what to look for is as easy as answering this simple question: what do you want in a scope? A supplemental question is what exactly do you want to get out of a new, upgraded scope? To help you on the right path, we’ve put together a list of five of the best Marlin 795 scopes currently on the market as of today. Before we get to our list, we’ll talk about what a Marlin 795 is used for and which magnification will work better for you (and other users). We will also discuss the reasons why these scopes, in particular, made the cut. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Marlin 795 Scopes OUR TOP PICK: Simmons Truplex .22 Mag Riflescope BEST BUDGET OPTION: BARSKA 3-9x32 Bushnell Optics, 2-7x/32mm Nikon Prostaff Rimfire II Vortex Optics Crossfire II Comparison of the Best Marlin 795 Scopes IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Simmons Truplex .22 Mag Riflescope Best overall Marlin 795 scope. High-definition optics for a crystal clear image picture. Made from high-quality aluminum for superior durability. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option BARSKA 3-9x32 Objective measured at 32mm. Magnification levels range from 3x to 9x. Multi-coated optics for low-light performance. "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Bushnell Optics, 2-7x/32mm Best Marlin 795 scope for the money. Pinpoint precision adjustments for better overall performance. Multi-coated optics for better clarity and low-light performance. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews "Nikon Prostaff Rimfire" II Parallax free at 50 yards. Instant zero reset turrets. Magnification settings range from 3x to 9x. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews "Vortex Optics Crossfire" II Features a BDC deadhold reticle. Body made from high-quality aluminum. Magnification levels range from 2x to 7x. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a Marlin 795 Used For and What is the Ideal Magnification? A Marlin 795 is a rifle that you can use in just about any application you can think of. But it’s varmint hunting and target shooting where it makes its bones. It may not be the most aesthetically-pleasing rifle of them all, but it definitely gets the job done in terms of reliability. Source Since it’s light in weight, it will definitely make portability a lot easier for you. So you’ll have a surefire winner on your hands regardless of which application you use it for. As for your ideal magnification, it should range from 3x to 9x. However, you should go with a magnification level that will be more comfortable for you. But you need to make sure you have a clear image upon setup before you can call it good. Why These Scopes Made Our List These scopes were not chosen at random. They were chosen because they had specific characteristics that stood out. If you’re looking for a crappy, low-quality scope, you won’t find one on the list below. But if you’re looking for a product that stands head and shoulders over the competition, you’ll need to look for the following characteristics: Body Construction An excellent scope should be strong enough to handle all kinds of recoil. The shock from the recoil might be enough to throw off your settings and that alone can lead to the frustrating task of having to constantly reset your scope. Source Most scopes on the list are made from high-quality aluminum. They are tough and shockproof, so you won’t have to worry about losing zero even if you uninstall it from the rifle itself and it somehow slips out of your hands and hits the ground. Magnification As mentioned, the ideal magnification for these scopes will be about 3x to 9x. You might settle for something with a little more magnification, but it may be a little blurry in picture quality. Of course, that might also depend on the amount of eye relief your scope has. Eye Relief “Scope eye” is the last thing that you’ll ever want to deal with. You don’t want to look too closely at your scope while firing your rifle. The recoil will kick back so hard it may cause serious eye injury. So you need a scope that will be worth looking through with both eyes. You should be able to see the image perfectly while only a few inches away from your face. Quick Take - The Best Marlin 795 Scopes These are our recommendations for the best Marlin 795 scopes: Simmons Truplex .22 Mag Riflescope BARSKA 3-9x32 Bushnell Optics, 2-7x/32mm Review of the Best Marlin 795 Scopes The following is a list of the five best Marlin 795 scopes currently on the market as of today. While the list might be subject to change between now and the next year, this is your opportunity to take a look at the scopes that are popular right now for this rifle. No matter what the application is, you want a scope that is clear to see through and delivers consistent pinpoint accurate shooting each time. Now, let’s dig into our list by unveiling our “best overall” choice: Best Overall: Simmons Truplex .22 Mag Riflescope CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Eye Relief is Pretty Decent Easy to Mount, Only Takes a Few Minutes Excellent for Varmint and Pest Hunting Shot Groups Were Tight at 50 to 100 Yards Out It Can Still Give You a Clear Image in Even the Harshest of Weather Conditions Cons May Not Fit Picatinny Rails The Mounts That Come With This May Not Hold Up Very Well Some Have Had Issues With Seeing the Crosshairs When Set to Certain Distances What Recent Buyers Report Most of the recent buyers were impressed with the overall image quality of the scope. It’s crystal clear and definitely shows no signs of anything being less than that. The eye relief is decent at just about four inches. You can still look through it and quickly acquire a target using both eyes. The construction is solid and definitely built to last. Why it Stands Out to Us Whenever we hear the words “tough” and “high-quality images”, we know it’ll be a scope that will be hard to compete with, especially with this produc which is considered the best of the best. We love it simply because it has the ability to give you precise, accurate shots from 50 to 100 yards out. So it definitely makes its money in all kinds of short-range situations. Who Will Use This Most Varmint and pest hunters will likely benefit from this scope the most. It will definitely be your best friend out in the field or if you’re defending your garden or property from critters who want nothing more than to destroy your crops or anything that you hold near and dear to your heart. No pest or varmint will be a match for your Marlin 795. What Could be Improved and Why This product should be able to mount easily on all kinds of rail systems. If you have a Picatinny or a Weaver rail, it should be easy enough to attach it without a problem. Also, it should come without the base. You can find so many high-quality scope mounts on the market. Bottom Line If you’re looking for an excellent scope that won’t steer you wrong during a hunt, you’ll definitely want to give this Simmons Truplex scope a closer look. It’s definitely a scope worth using if you’re intending to use it for short distance shooting. Plus, it might be the only scope that small game hunters will need to rely on. Runner-Up: BARSKA 3-9x32 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Image Quality is Quite Clear Solid Construction and Very Durable Great for Hunting and Target Practice It Can Handle All Kinds of Harsh Weather Conditions Very Good Accuracy With Targets Situated at About 100 Yards Out Cons Adjustments Might Be a Little Stiff at First Optics May Not Be Clear at the Max Magnification Level Some Have Complained it Does Not Hold Position for Long "What Recent Buyers" Report Recent buyers say this scope was quite useful for the purpose of target shooting and plinking. Some of them have already used this for clay pigeon shooting. Despite reports of consistently accurate shots hitting targets from 100 yards out, it has the potential to go even farther. Some have said they were able to hit clay pigeon targets from 300 yards away. So it might have a little more distance than expected. Why it Stands Out to Us This product is quite sturdy. At the same time, the field of view is pretty decent. At 32 mm, the objective is a good size that will definitely give you a leg up in quickly acquiring your target. Not to mention, this puppy can get the job done whether you’re a small game hunter or a competitive shooter. Who Will "Use This Most" Expect target shooters of both the casual and competitive variety to use this scope to their advantage. If you're looking to up your accuracy considerably, then you definitely want to put this scope on the top of your list. Especially when better accuracy can give you a better edge over your competition. What Could be Improved and Why One of the things that might need improvement is making the adjustments a bit more fluid. Sure, it might be fine for some just to simply use a coin to adjust the parallax or windage and elevation but even that can be a challenge for some. To save time, the adjustments should be a bit smoother. Bottom Line The Barska scope has the ideal magnification levels that a Marlin 795 scope should have. At the same time, it definitely lives up to its ability to be a reliable scope that can deliver a precise and accurate shot, especially in the applications where accuracy counts much more than anything else. Best for the Money: Bushnell Optics, 2-7x/32mm CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Eye Relief is Decent Fits on Most Picatinny Rails All Kinds of Easy Adjustments The Sight Picture is Pretty Good Reticle Marks are Accurate for Their Assigned Distances. It Can Hit Targets Accurately From 100 Yards Out Cons Might Be a Little Weighty Might Be a Little Bulky in Size Mounting it Might Be a Challenge for Some What Recent Buyers Report Aside from it being an affordable scope for most budgets, most recent buyers loved this product. Users have attached it to their Picatinny rails and had no issues with it. It stayed in place and continued to hold its zero after 20 or so rounds. They expect it to remain that way when they shoot off more rounds. Why it Stands Out to Us Bushnell is probably one of the most reliable brands as far as scopes go. So it’s no surprise that we see them make the cut. But the name alone isn’t why they’re on the list. It’s a versatile scope that definitely has the potential to become a formidable threat to any varmints and pests. Who Will Use This Most Mostly hunters. But don’t count out your casual target shooters as well. If you’re looking for something that will give you decent image quality in low-light settings, this scope might just be what you’re looking for, especially when most hunters tend to get their bag limits in low light conditions. What Could be Improved and Why One of the things that could be improved is a reduction in the scope size. While it can still do some damage with every shot you take, the scope shouldn’t stick out like a sore thumb. Plus, it might make the rifle look less compact in size. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a scope from a brand that is considered trustworthy by most and is affordable for all kinds of budgets, this scope from Bushnell might be your cup of coffee. It’s a tough scope with decent image quality and precise shooting ability that stands head and shoulders above most high-quality scopes. It’s got more than what you’ll pay for and is way better than any other budget scope on the market. 4. Nikon Prostaff Rimfire II CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Holds Zero After 100+ Yards Target Acquisition is Quick and Easy High-Quality Optics. Very High in Definition It Can Survive Drops From 3 or 4 Feet Above the Ground. Very Durable Magnification Levels Maintain Crisp Quality Without Any Additional Issues Cons Not a Good Scope for Long-Range Shooting Some Have Had Trouble Keeping it Zeroed In Some Complained About the Reticle Not Being Good Enough for Target Shooting What Recent Buyers Report As expected, many recent buyers loved the image quality. One said it’s probably the clearest image he’s seen compared to other scopes. Other than that, the crosshairs tend to stay visible, even in different magnification settings. They won’t disappear like some other scopes. Why it Stands Out to Us This scope is more than just ridiculously clear optics. It’s actually pretty dang durable. It’s made from high-quality aluminum and proves itself to be quite tough with its ability to resist shock, fog, and water. In harsh weather conditions, it can definitely hold its own. Who Will Use This Most Since it may not be a good long-range scope, it will come in handy at short distances of up to 200 yards. So, if you’re a hunter that is more of a small or big game hunter, you might benefit from this scope the most, especially when you’re able to get an excellent view of your target from that distance. What Could be Improved and Why One of the things that might be worth improving is making the reticle a little bit more reliable for other applications other than shooting. This might mean tweaking the adjusting abilities a bit. Other than that, there are no major improvements that are needed. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a scope that gives you excellent optics and accurate shooting like nothing else, then this Nikon Prostaff might be exactly what you’re looking for. At this point, we’re expecting this to be the dark horse candidate for the “best overall” title in the next year. Don’t be shocked if it ends up being that way. 5. Vortex Optics Crossfire II CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Lifetime Warranty Included Holds a Decent Zero at 100 Yards Has a Decent Eye Relief of 4 Inches Excellent for Medium Range Shooting Super Durable Scope. It Will Last You Years or Even Decades Cons Some Were Not Happy With the Eye Relief Lighted Dot May Be a Little Weak for Low-Light Conditions The Reticle May Become Blurry at Some Magnification Levels What Recent Buyers Report Most recent buyers took this out to the range and were instantly able to zero it in at about 100 yards. No further issues to speak of. Aside from that, one buyer was surprised to see his scope hold zero even after he fired off 50 rounds. Why it Stands Out to Us Vortex is probably one of the best scope brands on the market. They are best known for having the most durable scopes in the world. They are so confident in this that they have a lifetime warranty. So if something happens, they will always back up their product. It’s why we consider it a very trustworthy brand. Who Will Use This Most This might be the closest thing you can get to a multi-purpose scope. So if you’re a hunter, a target shooter, or a competitive shooter, this might be the best possible scope you can use for a Marlin 795 rifle. What Could be Improved and Why The ability to function a little better in low-light settings would be a start. The reticle is pretty much impossible to see when there is little to no sunlight. So the optics should be improved a bit to ensure that you are able to see and recognize your target without having to rely on a whole lot of sunlight. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a scope that is built to last and reliable in almost any application, the Vortex Crossfire II is definitely the scope that is worth a closer look. This might be your scope for the long-term. So if you’re looking for something that might be the last scope you’ll ever buy for a while, you may want to consider choosing this scope over the others. Why You Should Opt For a Quality Scope If you have a stock or factory issued scope, odds are it won’t do a good job at what it’s intended to do. So it’s always a great idea to upgrade to a better quality scope. Here are a few perks and advantages that you might experience should you choose to upgrade to a new scope for your Marlin 795: Better Accuracy Obviously, this is the one major advantage that you’ll enjoy with a better scope. No matter what your application is, you want something that will allow you to reach out and touch something from a certain distance. If you’re a varmint hunter, get a scope that will have the ability to consistently hit targets from 200 yards out. If you’re a target hunter, get a scope that has a reticle that will deliver consistent bullseye shots. Better Clarity Some scopes may not be able to give you a whole lot of clarity and the adjustments might make it a little more complex. Look for scopes that have crystal clear optics. They don’t have to be top-of-the-line in terms of clarity, but good enough to where the definition is not grainy. Better Reliability Reliability is the time you need a scope that can get the job done. It can be when you’re staring down at a can’t-miss target or when the competition is on the line. No matter what, you want a scope that will work consistently with each and every shot you take. So it’s important to find a scope where it’s easy to make zero settings. On top of that, the quicker you can break-in a scope, the better off you’ll be. Conclusion The best Marlin 795 scope is out there. All it takes is for you to find one that will fit your personal preferences and needs. If you find one of the five scopes above appealing to you, please be sure to do your in-depth research with customer reviews and gun forums. Find out what other people are saying about the scope before making a final purchasing decision. Once you find one that you like, you’ll be relying on it for many years to come.

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you’ve ever looked into Glock conversions or stabilizers, you’ve probably seen the same options I have…and been a little unimpressed. I’ve tried a large number of these types of things, and the best option I’ve come across has always been the MechTech Glock Carbine Conversion , which is alright, but I don’t love it enough to recommend it to anyone.  In fact, my recommendation has usually been to just build yourself an AR in a pistol caliber chambering with something like a 9mm Glock-compatible lower ($139.